Mike's 1973 D22 Complete tear out. From the Roof down!

Started by RockwoodMike, September 25, 2019, 11:43 PM

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RockwoodMike

Still working on the foundation frame..This frame work looks like something you would see inside a Sherman tank..And strong as can be..

Pic 4 shows the right rear area where the propane tanks go..Test fitting the original door to the frame and it fits just fine..

Pic 5 shows with the square that I am perpendicular to the floor with the framing..

Pic 6 shows that the original factory outriggers are bent..From time or just installed out of square..I am going to cut them off partially to be able to bend them straight again..

Pic 7 shows there is 3 out of square brackets.

There is NOTHING on this rig that doesn't need fixing, repairing, rebuilding or replacing!!
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

RockwoodMike

Pic 1...Shows the fitting of the sheet metal that goes on the inside of the skirt..This is below the floor..I guess it could be called a rock guard..

Pic 2..Rolled on the primer using Rustolium Rusty primer..Oil based.

Pic 3...That bracket that is used to mount the skirt that was way out of plumb..What caused that was it also supports the front step..So as someone steps on the step it would twist this downward..After 50 years, I could see why it was so messed up.

Pic 4...I cut the weld and bent it straight..And then added this triangular brace ..Straight and strong now!

And no I do not make my living as a welder :P
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

RockwoodMike

I am going to permanently mount this to the coach tomorrow..With butyl tape at the seam at the floor line..

The only thing that is missing is the door frame..It would be a good investment of time to make from steel..But this frame work should be in place and cut in the door frame..

The rest of the wall will be built of wood..
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

Eyez Open

Given today's pricing is aluminum more expensive than wood. Prior to owning a rambler I would have been highly skeptical of aluminum. Today I would highly recommend it. In less it priced crazy.
Either way I admire your build and efforts.

RockwoodMike

Quote from: Eyez Open on October 04, 2023, 12:51 PMGiven today's pricing is aluminum more expensive than wood

I will get back to you on that..My supplier that had the steel on hand can get aluminum also. I would need to invest in an adapter to my welder that would handle the aluminum wire..I believe you would need a new tank for the shielding gas for aluminum..

When you do regular MIG (metal inert gas) you have a tank of Argon CO2 mix as the shielding gas..
With aluminum, it is pure CO2..Or maybe it is is pure Argon..

Either way it will take a bit of an investment just to make it set up to weld aluminum..
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

RockwoodMike

The attachment the lower wall that I have been working on has come to a screeching halt after I saw this on line.. I was going to use those self tapping screws that have the drill bit on the end of it..

But then I saw this Rivet nut system that seems much better..Just clamp the frame work to the chassis and re drill 1/4 inch holes where mounting points would be..

Then install these "Rivnuts" with the special tool..Using 1/4-20 bolts, you can then bolt it to the chassis..

I have everything being shipped now..it will take a bit of time to get here..Got one update on the shipping of the tool and they said they just finished roping it to the turtle and it is on it's way.. :grin:

I think this will be much more secure than screws..
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

Eyez Open

My rambler is riveted at every point, so far not one metal screw, and not one loose connection. Very impressive for a 40yr old 30ft truck/RV.At the same time very easy to remove and re-rivet...So far :)ThmbUp

RockwoodMike

Just got the quote on the aluminum..For a 20 foot stick..1.5" square..16 gauge...

55 per stick..
Going to go to my welding supply shop and see what a tank of gas is needed and the spool gun cost will be

Wood..Home depot has 2x2, 8 foot long kiln dry wood at $3.50 each..That is 8.75 for 20 feet..

Aluminum is pretty much permanent..Wood rots away as all Winnebago owners know 
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

Eyez Open

Almost twice as expensive, I've used those 2×2 for a few jobs. One spefic job was my homedepot cheapo cabinets, I literally built a roll cage in each one to reinforce each cabinet.Glued and screwed and sealed with paint. So far so good, no warping but they are solidly attached to the press board cabinets Yep just said that.

Just a reflection here, someday I will sell this old RV, I completely expect over 10k or more for it. Simple reasons go find another working RV in this condition.Actually find one for 15k and get back to me. If your interested. Quite politely of course.

From what I've seen of your rebuild you absolutely have something special going on there.

.


RockwoodMike

Quote from: Eyez Open on October 05, 2023, 03:43 PMAlmost twice as expensive

Twice??

Aluminum is 6 times more expensive than wood..Plus all the extra equipment needed to weld the joints and miters
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

RockwoodMike

This is why I laid all the skin out..You can take some pretty good original measurements on how it was made..Reverse engineering!!

Pic 1..From the very top to bottom is 90 inches..Then the height is increased by the width of the roof material

Pic 3..Width of the original access door opening..27 inches..

Pic 4..All these numbers to create the door frame..It is just laid up there..not installed yet..

Still waiting for the rivet nut stuff to get here..These sellers on Ebay are in no hurry to get it to you..Slowest shipping(cheapest) method to get it to you..
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

RockwoodMike

Pic 1..Using the original side wall, it makes for a great template to replicate the top right corner..Just fit and weld it together..Use plenty of clamps to keep it in place while fitting the next piece..

Pic 2..Trial fit after Trial fit after Trial fit!!
The front panels are rotted away as usual..The edge of the panel were wood, but gone!!

Pic 3..All fitted up with the opening for the window in the bunk area..
This was all day to get this done..

Next is the area between what I just did and the lower foundation skirt area..And that should be it for the steel on this wall..Wood will finish up the mid section aft of the entry door..
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

RockwoodMike

Alright!!

Just finished the starboard side when it comes to the steel framing...I used 8 sticks of 1.5x1.5 16 gauge square tubing..Each stick weighs 30 pounds..240 total..This framing makes it as rock steady as can be..The rest of the wall aft of the entry door will be made from kiln dried wood..

The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

LJ-TJ

Hey Guys, Just back from a Bago trip. I was wondering Question RockwoodMike :  do you still have all the pictures you posted between September 28, 2019 and November 25, 2019?  Those would be the ones that should be on page 2 to page 10.  They've disappeared, and that is SOOOO disappointing!  What a great reference set for the rest of us - gone... Thanks mate. Keep up the good work Mark. Love this site.

RockwoodMike

I have all the pics..Most from the start are the rip out pictures..

The roof..differential and this starboard framing is about all I have accomplished on this project..

My first attempt at repairing the starboard wall was a fiasco and didn't work..What I was doing was replicating what Winnebago was doing..Using glue and staples..

So I am kind of glad that the pictures didn't come through on the ISP transfer that Oz did.
Because it shows how not to do something..

I will take a picture of what I did and then ripped it back out and show how wrong it was..
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

RockwoodMike

Pic 1..I designed and made this special jig for use on a wood router..Cad skills and a cnc plasma cutter has it's advantages!!

Pic 2..Make the center mark for the location of a stud on the base plate wood..

Pic 3..I went out and bought a Bauer hand router and a kit that has 5 router bits..Used the 3/8 size bit. With the jig in place and clamped, it is just a matter of cutting out what the jig allows you to do..1/4 deep to act as a pocket for the 2x2 stud..

Pic 4..Add a blob of construction adhesive and 2 pocket screws and that connection is going no where!!
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

LJ-TJ

Ok so we know I'm dumb as a stump. But Mike how do I enlarge the pic's so I can see them :rolleyes: Thanks

RockwoodMike

Quote from: LJ-TJ on October 15, 2023, 10:28 PMhow do I enlarge the pic's

That picture in post 414 is just a screen shot of the folder that I have all my pictures in..Not going to be able to enlarge them..

I will see what I can do to add in all the missing pictures
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

RockwoodMike

I think I need to clean this up some..getting a bit cluttered :rolleyes:
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

LJ-TJ


LJ-TJ

By the way....Your doing a magnificent job keeping us up to speed on your progress. The work your doing is mind blowing. Can't wait each day to see what you've accomplished. Thanks a million times over.

RockwoodMike

Pic 1..With the wall missing the roof was sagging under it's own weight..This back right corner needed to use a floor jack and 2x4 to lift it back up..

Pic 2..Yea I know, I am crazy with the steel, but it needs a good strong corner..
You just fit and measure and clamp it in place..Using the original skin to measure everything.

Pic 3..After everything was fitted and clamped in place, I tack welded it in place as best as I could..Took it all down and then fully welded it up..Plenty of use of the grinder too! :P

Pic 4..After all the welding and grinder cleanup, it actually fit back into place!! :)clap ..I need to weld in a mounting plate for the clearance light in the upper corner..Then I can paint it all up..
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

BigAlsVehicleEmporium

Quote from: RockwoodMike on October 15, 2023, 01:12 PMMy first attempt at repairing the starboard wall was a fiasco and didn't work..What I was doing was replicating what Winnebago was doing..Using glue and staples..

RockwoodMike, I'd love it if you posted pictures of what you did that didn't work. I'm going to have to rebuild my front passenger side wall and was planning on replicating the original construction. If that doesn't work well I'd love to know about it before I start!

Alan
1972 Winnebago Brave D20 - 413 V8, A727, Dana 70
"That leaves only me to blame, 'cause mama tried!"

RockwoodMike

You have a 2x4 originally made into the wall that is at the level of the floor..That 2x4 is screwed to the floor..And that 2x4 needs to be secured to the wall above and below it..The adhesive that I used was liquid nails..It stuck the foam and the 2x4 to the aluminum fair enough, but it was weak in comparison to the original factory strength..

But there was no adhesion between the 2x4 and the foam and i figured that needs to be a good connection..I used pressure treated wood..Maybe the oil that is used in the wood caused the weak connection..
Using regular wood probable would have been a better story..

I had ripped out everything inside and with the way the walls are just foam, it just seemed so flimsy..
I tried to cut slots in the foam to install 2x2 in the slots..Nothing was really working to my satisfaction..

So with all the other rot everywhere, I just said I will build it all again..Like the older trailers were made..Using something solid like steel, aluminum and wood.. 
 
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!

RockwoodMike

This is a picture of the rear lower wall that I remade..Yes I used pressure treated wood, but I ran the wood through a power planer to reduce the thickness from 1.5 inches to 3/4.because that is the original wall thickness..

Because I planned the wood down it removed the oiled surface and the glue stuck very well..

But in the other walls, the 2x4 was left full size and the glue didn't stick very well..

Bottom line..don't use pressure treated wood..It don't stick!!
The best mechanic is the one that can make it run with the least amount of parts!