Author Topic: Sliding Window Glass Replacement  (Read 7261 times)

Offline jstuart333

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  • Year: 1976
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  • Model: Chieftain
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Sliding Window Glass Replacement
« on: April 22, 2009, 08:16 AM »
In the December ice storm I had a sliding window break. I have authorization from the insurance company to get the glass replaced.

I'm considering just using the local automotive glass repair shop and leaving the rig in their possession while they measure, order, cut and install the new window.

I'm interested in any results folks have had with this and appropriate advice.

Offline russmehl

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  • Year: 1976
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Re: Glass replacement
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2009, 09:18 PM »
In order to put in a new piece of glass, the window needs to be removed from the wall, and the frame spread. Properly done the weld should be cut through, frame spread and re welded.
I tried to get a new glass for the dinette window on my 76 D26RT through Mobility RV and they couldn't find one. I managed to bang my two windows together because the fuzz was gone in the bottom channel and they moved way too easily. Only one survived.  :(
Since the glass in the sliding window is tempered, the glass shop would have to measure and order the piece from some place that tempers glass.
I ended up with a piece of acrylic which I could "spring" into the frame. Unfortunately, I used the dimensions in the parts diagram for the 76 D26RT microfiche on the Winnebago Industries site. It says 22 x 20.03. The 22 is good, but 21 is a better dimension. I ended up putting an aluminium extrusion on the end to extend it to the correct place, as well as stiffen the plastic.

Offline jstuart333

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Re: Glass replacement
« Reply #2 on: August 01, 2009, 11:18 AM »
After much planning I have managed to replace the rear passenger side sliding window myself. As with most projects on the coach, this one expanded with time.

The weatherstripping around the windows was rotted and the sliding and stationary glass seals had hardened over the last 33 years. I ordered replacement weatherstripping, and seals from the local Winnebago dealers. I was very pleased to see that Winnebago still offered the replacement seals that fit these windows. I got 75 feet of weatherstripping, and 35 feet of each of the seal types. Not cheap! I also picked up the weep hole covers.

Part Number        Description                               Color       Length/ amount  Units
002309-02-000     1/8" Stationary Glass Seal         Black      35  feet
024096-02-000     1/8" Slider Window Glass Seal   Black      35  feet
002324-02-000     1/8" Weather Strip Channel        Black      75  feet
023713-02-000     Weep Hole Covers                     Black      20  count

I made a template from the driver's side slider, measuring to ensure that it would just slip into the window frame. I did not want to remove the frame and perform surgery on it. I took the template to the local glass shop and got the tempered glass window and a lexan window. The lexan was the fall-back and provides me with a temporary replacement if another window should shatter.

The glass took about a week to arrive, coming in a little later than the weatherstripping and seals.

Inserting the new window, weatherstripping and seals took about an hour. The window was just short enough to slip tightly into the frame. I installed the weatherstripping in sections, making certain to cut it at the weepholes for drainage. I used the roller tool I have for inserting the spline for screens to press the weatherstripping into place. That tool made the work go quickly and smoothly.  I moved the glass to one end, put as much of the weatherstripping as would go into the channel butting up against the glass, slide the glass into the newly installed weatherstripping and completed the rest of the channel. The two rear windows and the one over the sink were done in two sections. The large slider over the dinette was done in four sections, one to cover each slider in the window and two to complete the top and bottom sections. The passenger front window was done with three sections, open channel when the window was forward, then the top and bottom sections. I decided against replacing the driver's side weatherstripping. There were two reasons, first, the weatherstripping was in good shape, second, the slider had been replaced before and was oversized (too long), making it extremely difficult to get the weatherstripping to meet in the channels.

One note on the replacement window for the rear. After I installed it I noticed that the left and right sides were different lengths by about 1/4 inch. The support for the screen was in a different location. It also means the latch for the glass is just a little off. I used E6000 craft adhesive to attach the latches to the windows. So far, so good. I have had difficulty in the past getting the latches to stay in place.

The seals were actually easier. I purchased a one inch wide seam roller at the paint store to push the weatherstripping into the channel. It was useful sometimes, but not required. Pulling the old seal was the most difficult work. It was very stiff and required pliers to get a good grip after prying one end out of the channel. The seal 'clipped' into the front edge and I pushed the back edge (actually the middle) into the channel and used the roller on the middle to press it in tightly. I used a box cutter to cut it to size. I have it butted up close to the slider seal. For the stationary glass a different procedure is required. The seal does not fill a channel, then overlap to the glass like the slider. It slides under the aluminum frame and provides a compression seal against the stationary glass panel. The flexibility of the new seal made putting it in easier than taking out the old. The was mostly finger work in placing the seal, with occasional help from a flat bladed screwdriver. The important factor is to get the glass lined up in the window and seat on top of the spacers located along the bottom channel. This arrangement ensures the glass if flat against the aluminum channel on the inside and the spacing for the seal is consistent on the outside.

Left overs: 4 feet of sliding seal, 7 feet of stationary seal, 23 feet of weatherstripping. Would be about 15 had I done the driver's window.

The windows are sliding better than before. The seals are keeping most of the water out although they do crinkle in the corners. I have kept the old seals as a safety measure. If these new are all good, I dispose of those old ones in about a year.

This is more time-consuming than hard, averaging about 45 minutes per window. We have had lots of rain in New England this summer making work days difficult to find.

Send messages if you have questions.

John

Offline Oz

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Re: Sliding Window Galss Replacement
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2009, 06:08 PM »
That was an excellent instructional post on how to do it yourself!

However, the original question remains open:

Has anyone had this done by a shop?  And if so, what was the cost?

My suggestion:  take the window to some shops or call them for an estimate.  Be prepared with the needed information.  I.e.  Pane size, type of glass needed, what vehicle it's for.  Since you have a classic Winnebago, most likely they won't have a clue on how to replace it until they see it.
Previously enjoyed our '74 - D24 Indian & '74 - D24 Indian Custom

Offline jstuart333

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Re: Sliding Window Glass Replacement
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2009, 06:59 PM »
I did try two different shops. I drove up in the motorhome to a Portland Glass center and they refused to work on the window.

The second show was a Marvel Glass Company. They were willing to try but it was well beyond the capability and knowledge of the technician who was on duty that day. We did remove the weatherstripping and tried to get the driver's side windows out to use as a template for the broken right side. The stationary glass would come out even though it was a tight fit. The slider would not come out. I was reluctant to take the window frame out at the shop since they had no place to store a camper with a missing window and neither did I.

Those actions brought me to making a template of the driver's side sliding rear window and just having them cut the glass. I have had most of the windows off and on through the years, mostly for resealing with better weatherstripping, and I really don't like the removal, weatherstip and reinstall process. This is at least the 3rd pane I have replaced. I did have the driver's side front slider pane replaced by a Winnebago dealer and I was not pleased with the final result. They did open the frame and try to reclose it but it was never as tight as original. It was so many years ago, that I cannot find the cost. I was hoping someone had a better and more recent experience.

Hope that answers some of questions.

Offline Oz

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Re: Sliding Window Galss Replacement
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2009, 07:15 PM »
I ran into a similar situation.  I tried Cindy Rowe Auto Glass, truck glass repairs shops, and other glass shops.  Same results.  They wouldn't even work on them.

This is one of the major benefits of belonging to our community:  Here, you can find out how to do things yourself that auto shops won't or can't do.  As a result, you can have the confidence it was done right because you did it, and save a ton of money in the process.
Previously enjoyed our '74 - D24 Indian & '74 - D24 Indian Custom

Offline Jonbbrew

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Re: Sliding Window Glass Replacement
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2018, 05:47 AM »
Keep Er' Goin' Eh!

Jonathan

Offline tmsnyder

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Re: Sliding Window Glass Replacement
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2018, 07:13 AM »
Someone will chime in for the seal, but for the glass, I had to replace one of my sliding windows.  It was flat, tempered (based on the tiny pieces of glass I found everywhere after buying the rv), had 2 of 4 corners rounded with a specific radius that I was able to measure from one of the other windows, and had smoothed ground edges.  All of these options were able to be ordered at OneDayGlass.com , even tinting is available.   I designed the glass on their easy online drawing program, ordered it and it arrived in the mail within a few days. 


Mine has an aluminum channel on one side for a handle and for the lock to engage on it, I stuck that on with silicone sealant.


Check it out:  www.onedayglass.com

Online Rickf1985

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Re: Sliding Window Glass Replacement
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2018, 08:56 AM »
That link will work out perfectly for me! I have been trying to find a replacement glass for a door on an old Jotul woodstove.


Thanks

Offline srosa707

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Re: Sliding Window Glass Replacement
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2018, 12:13 AM »