Author Topic: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal  (Read 1817 times)

Offline srosa707

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  • Posts: 111
  • Member since: 2017
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: D20
  • Chassis: Dodge
  • Engine: 318
1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« on: July 17, 2018, 04:01 PM »
A while back I came home from work to a broken stationary window in my Winnebago Brave.  The gardener called me as soon as he broke it to let me know what happened and since I was already looking into replacing the rubber in all of the windows, this just lit the candle and forced me to get it done sooner rather than later.  After searching the threads on this forum I realized it might be a challenge procuring the correct rubber for the replacement.  Below I will document how I finished this project and what I used.  There might be other/better methods, but this is how I did it.


Pic W2: Broken stationary glass on passenger side

Offline srosa707

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  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: D20
  • Chassis: Dodge
  • Engine: 318
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2018, 04:05 PM »
Ironically, a few days before I had started to pull some rubber out of the windows to see what I needed.  As you can see in the pic, the black rubber is now gray in color and hard as a rock.  Other pieces of rubber in this Brave are cracked through.


Pic W3: This is the slider window rubber that will prove to be the thorn in my side on this project
Pic W4: This is the stationary glass rubber

Offline srosa707

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  • Posts: 111
  • Member since: 2017
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: D20
  • Chassis: Dodge
  • Engine: 318
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2018, 04:17 PM »
Winnebago offers 3 items here: the stationary glass rubber, slider rubber, and slider felt.  There was some confusion as to what was required and after much searching, I found WinnebagoParts.com (WBP) had what I needed (or so I thought).  As you can see in the pictures W5 and W6 the black replacement rubber from WBP looks much different than the rubber in the picture W3 from my previous post.  That is because this rubber is WRONG!  I will address this later in the thread.


Part: Glazing - Window - Black - 1/8" Stationary Glass (WBP terminology)
Price: $1.50/ft
Man: WinnbagoParts.com
P/N: 00230902000


Part: Channel Weather Strip W/fuzz for 1/8" Glass
Price: $1.75/ft, minimum of 25ft required for order
Man: Winnebagoparts.com
P/N: 00232402000


This next part is WRONG WRONG WRONG from WBP.  DO NOT ORDER!
Part: Seal - Exterior Glass To Frame, Slider Glass
Price: $1.60/ft
Man: WinnebagoParts.com
P/N: 02409602000


Pic W5a: This is the rubber from WBP that is WRONG.  Notice the lip.  Per my window guy, this prevented the window from sliding.
Pic W6a: WRONG rubber test-installed into window frame.  Notice abnormal appearance when in the channel.

Offline srosa707

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  • Posts: 111
  • Member since: 2017
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: D20
  • Chassis: Dodge
  • Engine: 318
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2018, 05:00 PM »
Now, to the window.  I used a method I read on here to remove the window (cant remember who posted it?). 


Pic W7: First, I went inside the RV and removed the sill plate. 
Pic W8: Once removed, I measured where the frame sat in the hole so that I could replace it to its original location. 
Pic W9: After that, I went outside and placed blue painters tape around the perimeter of the frame to protect the paint from the tools I used to pry the window out. 
Pic W10: I used a razor to open up the butyl tape that seals the window frame to the outside of the body panel.  Once I got a decent gap, I used a scraper tool to pry the frame away from the body.  Do this all the way around and the window and frame should pop out.  *NOTE: the frame is tack welded together from the factory.  Carefully grind these tacks down to separate frame to remove glass, rubber, or felt. 

Offline srosa707

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  • Posts: 111
  • Member since: 2017
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  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: D20
  • Chassis: Dodge
  • Engine: 318
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2018, 05:13 PM »
Since the glass was broken I had to take it to a local shop to have the glass remade.  The first glass shop (suggested to me by a buddy) I took it too turned out to be a nightmare.  Ill spare you the details.  They made the glass but I had to go pick up all of my materials and take it to a different glass shop.  Since the gardener said he would pay for the repair, I decided to let the professionals deal with installing the rubber since I couldnt seem to get it to fit right (ref. picture W6a).  I dropped off all of the rubber I ordered from WBP, my window frame, and the new glass the previous shop cut for me.  The next day, the glass shop called and said the slider rubber was wrong and would not fit properly (BIG SURPRISE!).  They said they had a solution and not to worry.  A few days later I picked up my glass and they showed me their fix to the issue.  They used different rubber and cut it in half to fit.  I asked if I could buy it for future repairs and the owner said "just come by when you need more and I'll hook you up".  I have no part number, manufacturer, or price for this material.  If you are fixing your window and need this rubber I suggest you visit a reputable glass shop and they should be able to improvise something for you. 


Pic W14 & W16: Rubber installed by glass shop for the slider portion of the window.
Pic W17: Slider rubber from glass shop installed.
Pic W18: Stationary rubber from WBP installed.

Offline srosa707

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  • Posts: 111
  • Member since: 2017
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  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: D20
  • Chassis: Dodge
  • Engine: 318
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2018, 05:21 PM »
Once I got the window back from the glass shop I took several hours to thoroughly clean the frame before reinstalling.  I wanted to ensure a clean and secure seal once finished.  For this I relied on my scraper, razor, and simple green solution.  Get comfortable 'cause this part sucks!  Once I got this finished and let it dry out, I used an aluminum infused epoxy to seal the frame back together, installed the butyl tape to the edge, and installed it back in the Winnebago.  I highly recommend a second set of hands help you so you don't drop the glass!  I purchased all new stainless hardware to go back in the window frame, as well.  Make sure you utilize your previous measurements you took to put the window back where it came from.  Reinstall inside frame and caulk the outside and youre done!


Pic W12: Cleaning this thing sucks.
Pic W13: Frame epoxied and butyl tape installed.
Pic W19: All installed in the Brave (minus side mirror).

Offline LJ-TJ

  • 14 year member
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  • Year: 1975
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: D21
  • Chassis: Dodge
  • Engine: 440-3
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2018, 06:52 PM »
 :)ThmbUp WOW! Perfect. Well done. Thank for taking the time to document this project with pic's and all. It will be a big help to a lot of folks. :)clap

Offline Rickf1985

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  • Year: 1989
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  • Model: Chieftain
  • Chassis: Chevy
  • Engine: 454
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2018, 07:53 PM »
And you get free gardening for the rest of the year!

Offline srosa707

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  • Posts: 111
  • Member since: 2017
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: D20
  • Chassis: Dodge
  • Engine: 318
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2018, 10:04 PM »
The gardener sent out a check for the repairs as soon as I told him the price.  I didn't charge him labor for the cleanup, removal, or installation of the window.  If I had, I would have had free gardening for 2 years! :)rotflmao

Offline Jonbbrew

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  • Posts: 101
  • "Don't let your hatred for life,impact my life"-ME
  • Member since: 2016
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Indian D24
  • Chassis: Dodge M400
  • Engine: 440
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2018, 12:55 AM »
Since the glass was broken I had to take it to a local shop to have the glass remade.  The first glass shop (suggested to me by a buddy) I took it too turned out to be a nightmare.  Ill spare you the details.  They made the glass but I had to go pick up all of my materials and take it to a different glass shop.  Since the gardener said he would pay for the repair, I decided to let the professionals deal with installing the rubber since I couldnt seem to get it to fit right (ref. picture W6a).  I dropped off all of the rubber I ordered from WBP, my window frame, and the new glass the previous shop cut for me.  The next day, the glass shop called and said the slider rubber was wrong and would not fit properly (BIG SURPRISE!).  They said they had a solution and not to worry.  A few days later I picked up my glass and they showed me their fix to the issue.  They used different rubber and cut it in half to fit.  I asked if I could buy it for future repairs and the owner said "just come by when you need more and I'll hook you up".  I have no part number, manufacturer, or price for this material.  If you are fixing your window and need this rubber I suggest you visit a reputable glass shop and they should be able to improvise something for you. 


Pic W14 & W16: Rubber installed by glass shop for the slider portion of the window.
Pic W17: Slider rubber from glass shop installed.
Pic W18: Stationary rubber from WBP installed.


I have this same issue with finding that outdated seal. How did your slider work with fabricated seal? How about any water issue concerns ?
Do you have side view of fabricated rubber seal?



Keep Er' Goin' Eh!

Jonathan

Offline Jonbbrew

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  • Posts: 101
  • "Don't let your hatred for life,impact my life"-ME
  • Member since: 2016
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Indian D24
  • Chassis: Dodge M400
  • Engine: 440
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #10 on: October 19, 2018, 01:01 AM »
Now, to the window.  I used a method I read on here to remove the window (cant remember who posted it?). 


Pic W7: First, I went inside the RV and removed the sill plate. 
Pic W8: Once removed, I measured where the frame sat in the hole so that I could replace it to its original location. 
Pic W9: After that, I went outside and placed blue painters tape around the perimeter of the frame to protect the paint from the tools I used to pry the window out. 
Pic W10: I used a razor to open up the butyl tape that seals the window frame to the outside of the body panel.  Once I got a decent gap, I used a scraper tool to pry the frame away from the body.  Do this all the way around and the window and frame should pop out.  *NOTE: the frame is tack welded together from the factory.  Carefully grind these tacks down to separate frame to remove glass, rubber, or felt.


Doing my glass is intacted do I still have to pull frame off and break weld to replace seals and felt? Or can they be done while on vehicle?
Keep Er' Goin' Eh!

Jonathan

Offline srosa707

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  • Posts: 111
  • Member since: 2017
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: D20
  • Chassis: Dodge
  • Engine: 318
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #11 on: October 23, 2018, 01:20 PM »
The new seal works fine.  Ive washed it and taken it to the coast on two different trips and have not had an issue with it. 


No, you cannot replace the rubber and felt with it in the vehicle.  Yes, you will have to split the frame once its apart to get the glass out.  Not a huge deal once you have it apart.  Use epoxy to hold it together when you put it all back together.

Offline Jonbbrew

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  • Posts: 101
  • "Don't let your hatred for life,impact my life"-ME
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  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Indian D24
  • Chassis: Dodge M400
  • Engine: 440
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #12 on: October 25, 2018, 07:33 PM »
The new seal works fine.  Ive washed it and taken it to the coast on two different trips and have not had an issue with it. 


No, you cannot replace the rubber and felt with it in the vehicle.  Yes, you will have to split the frame once its apart to get the glass out.  Not a huge deal once you have it apart.  Use epoxy to hold it together when you put it all back together.
Thanks. So what seal worked? And do you have to get the glass out to replace seals or did you need glasswork too?
Keep Er' Goin' Eh!

Jonathan

Offline Jonbbrew

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  • Posts: 101
  • "Don't let your hatred for life,impact my life"-ME
  • Member since: 2016
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Indian D24
  • Chassis: Dodge M400
  • Engine: 440
Re: 1973 Winnebago Brave Window Replacement and Reseal
« Reply #13 on: December 02, 2019, 01:14 AM »
The new seal works fine.  Ive washed it and taken it to the coast on two different trips and have not had an issue with it. 


No, you cannot replace the rubber and felt with it in the vehicle.  Yes, you will have to split the frame once its apart to get the glass out.  Not a huge deal once you have it apart.  Use epoxy to hold it together when you put it all back together.
I had read/heard that the window frame is welded or riveted together. Is that what you noticed? What are you breaking apart and having it held together with epoxy?
Keep Er' Goin' Eh!

Jonathan

 

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