Author Topic: "Vintage" Winnies: More valuable as collector items or as entry-level RVs?  (Read 5163 times)

Offline dezertgurl

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  • Posts: 29
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Brave
  • Chassis: Dodge
  • Engine: SOLD
I recently attended a show where pre-1965 travel trailers had been given some new paint, fabric and sometimes appliances, then were given astonishingly high price tags as well! And I've read about various clubs for older trailers, but nothing at all about motorhomes. So I wondered, are there avid collectors of RVs as well? Or is the high price of gas making folks shy away from them?  What do you guys think??




Just sold 1973 Winnie D20 Brave

Offline khantroll

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  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1972
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Chieftain D24CL
  • Chassis: Dodge M375
  • Engine: 413
The motorhomes are a slightly different beast then a vintage trailer. The automobile portion of the vehicle can be quite difficult/expensive to source parts for. The chassis adds a complication to restoration work as well. Add to that the fact that few of them have survived, and you have an overall less attractive option.


Age is another issue as well. A lot of those trailers are fifties style, and that is the nostalgia they are chasing with these vintage trailers (Spartans, Canned Hams, tear drops, etc). Most vintage motorhomes date from the age of shag carpeting, which doesn't seem to generate the same warm and fuzzy feelings for most people.


The existence of this club is proof that there are people who are enthusiastic about these rigs. There have even been examples of the sort of restomod process you describe, and I suppose they have sold (I saw them on eBay). But generally, these rigs are not nearly as popular as a collectible/vintage RV as compared to the trailers.


I also don't believe they are relegated to first RVs as you suggest; in fact, they are poorly suited to that. Newer RVs can be had for similar money, and will offer a much simpler experience compared to even a well kept example of a truly vintage RV.


Really, these are rat rods at this point. They have been used, mostly hard, and then found their way into the hands of people who are passionate about the aesthetic/ideal these represent, and these people utilize creativity to make them a personalized example of that ideal.


Just my meandering 2 cents.

Offline M & J

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  • Model: Allegro
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Rat Rods. I think that is an excellent description of these old girls.
M & J

Online LJ-TJ

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WELL! I can't say I totally agree. I feel at the moment they are wondering. Most start out because people love the lines and they invoke pleasant memories from there youth and a time when only the rich could own one. Now with those memories in mind they find one and grab it up. These old girls haven't been beat up, they've just been neglected. There usually really low mileage. So you get those folks who just want to get it running and go camping. You then get those who want to restore one back as close to new as possible with all original equipment. Then you get those who want to have the old style but up grade all the equipment. Finally you get the hot rodders who want to make retro look cool and slam them and re-engine them. You can find a Classic Winnebago 1966 to 1978 Eyebrow Winne from FREE, a couple hundred bucks to north of $15,000.00. There's a Winnie out there for everyone. And remember at one point in time no matter what make the motorhome was..as far as the general public was concerned they called every motorhome a Winnebago.   Hm?

Offline legomybago

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Aint that the truth ???
Never get crap happy with a slap happy pappy

Offline M & J

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Not starting an argument TJ or bago, but the quote below is why I think of these beasts as rat rods to a degree..

"The fact of the matter is that a rat rod is the working-class answer to high-buck hot rods and street rods and all the pageantry and ego that seems to go along with them. Rat rods are about heart, history, and having a good time. They're not about money, ego, and who has the most seamless clone of the car next to it."

That's a quote from a very popular "rat rod" users group.
Doesn't have to be some high horsepower cobbling of any parts that weld together to be called a ratrod. I think our coaches are the "ratrods" of the RV community. And we love them because our hearts and sweat are invested in them, not a monthly payment for 20 years.  :)ThmbUp
M & J

Online LJ-TJ

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Now why would that be starting an argument D:oH! I would have said it that way if I had a thought of it. That about sums up everybody here in one way or another. There's nothing we love more here than seeing what concoctions others come up with that we didn't think of that we can apply to our rigs. The gang here is great and Mark does a heck of a job. Even if we don't agree with him every time. ;)

Online LJ-TJ

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  • Engine: 440-3
Just finished up checking Classic Winnebago's for Sale and noticed the price for this summer on these old girls is up by about $1,000.00.

Offline khantroll

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  • Engine: 413
It may well be that I understated the appeal of an Eyebrow Winnie. They are popular, and making something of a comeback as vintage has come back in vogue. Heaven knows I love mine, and I do get appreciative stares when driving her even with her exterior not quite up to snuff atm.


The thing is, the market on them doesn't move like the vintage trailers (good for us), and people don't seem to go crazy about them the way they do Spartans and Airstreams (also good for us). They seem to me to be where some hot rods where when I was a kid: beloved by their communities, but not mainstream to the point that there is a place turning them out as toys.


M&J hit it right where I meant the rat road comment. I didn't mean a roached vehicle, or necessarily Frankenstein on Wheels, but the RV equivalent of a working man's hot rod.

Offline xerofall

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  • Year: 1973
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: D20 Brave
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  • Engine: 440
Funny, but the typical RV folk on Winnebago's Facebook page hate the new Tribute and Brave, they're still on their brown and grey swirly Tylenol capsule RV kick.

Offline Palladius

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  • Year: 1986
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  • Model: Chieftain 22
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  • Engine: 454
I own a 1986 Winnie Chieftain 22, does any one know were to buy the caution sticker on the LP asme tank?

Offline BrandonMc

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  • Year: 1987 coach / 1988 chassis
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  • Model: Chieftain
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  • Engine: 454
vanlife and rv's are becoming a fad. just look at youtube for probably a thousand different channels on the subject.


part of it is that many millennials can only afford a van. I almost was livin in my bago myself, but then realized i needed a job and winter was going to be cold. In northern colorado, a spot goes for as much or more than just renting a room in a house.




Offline BrandonMc

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  • Engine: 454
I own a 1986 Winnie Chieftain 22, does any one know were to buy the caution sticker on the LP asme tank?


go to an rv salvage yard is my best suggestion

Offline Rickf1985

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If you are talking about the metal tag that is welded on then you need the tag for THAT tank. It has all of the information pertaining to that particular tank.

Offline Palladius

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  • Year: 1986
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Chieftain 22
  • Chassis: P30
  • Engine: 454
The caution for the over fill bleed at 80% fill.. decal /sticker.

Offline Rickf1985

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  • Model: Chieftain
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  • Engine: 454
This is one you should be able to get at any propane filling station where they service the tanks. Same with the one you were asking about before if it is just the sticker for the door.

 

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