Author Topic: Weekday Full Time Boondocking Challenges--Preventing Freeze Over Weekend  (Read 12610 times)

Offline Rickf1985

  • *
  • Posts: 5598
  • Member since: 2013
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1989
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Chieftain
  • Chassis: Chevy
  • Engine: 454
These are all 12 volt deep cycle non starting batteries from Trojan. You can also find them from Deka and Exide.

http://www.trojanbattery.com/product/t-1260_plus/
http://www.trojanbattery.com/product/reliant-t1275-agm/
http://www.trojanbattery.com/product/27-gel/

Online ClydesdaleKevin

  • 11 year member
  • *
  • Posts: 4365
  • Member since: 2005
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1995
  • Make: Itasca
  • Model: Suncruiser 32RQ
  • Chassis: Oshkosh
  • Engine: Cummings Turbo Diesel
As far as the Trojan 6 volt batteries go, Interstate brand is right up there in quality, and quite a bit more affordable.

Kev
Kev and Patti, the furry kids, our 98 Cherokee lifted beastie tow vehicle, and our 1995 Itasca Suncruiser Diesel Pusher.

Offline Rickf1985

  • *
  • Posts: 5598
  • Member since: 2013
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1989
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Chieftain
  • Chassis: Chevy
  • Engine: 454
Well, It has been 30 plus years ago now but I had Interstate batteries in my shop. They would come once a month and rotate the stock so that I always had fresh batteries. I went through a LOT of batteries since I was a 4x4 shop and winches kill batteries. After a while I noticed that the batteries were going flat way to fast even in trucks without winches and they started not reimbursing me on warranty claims. I told them to come and take all their crap out of my shop which they finally did after begging me to reconsider. I knew a bunch of other shops did the same around the that time for the same reasons. I went to Exide and had no problems after that. I have heard that Interstate has improved since then but to me the damage is done. I bought one Interstate when I was stuck in another town and that battery only lasted me two years. That was only about eight years ago. Just my personal opinion.

Offline Rickf1985

  • *
  • Posts: 5598
  • Member since: 2013
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1989
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Chieftain
  • Chassis: Chevy
  • Engine: 454
Duplicate

Online ClydesdaleKevin

  • 11 year member
  • *
  • Posts: 4365
  • Member since: 2005
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1995
  • Make: Itasca
  • Model: Suncruiser 32RQ
  • Chassis: Oshkosh
  • Engine: Cummings Turbo Diesel
Our Interstate battery bank in the RV is about 3 years old now...and still holding a charge as long as the day they were new.  I do keep up with watering them, which helps...and I never let them drop below 12.2 volts.

Kev
Kev and Patti, the furry kids, our 98 Cherokee lifted beastie tow vehicle, and our 1995 Itasca Suncruiser Diesel Pusher.

Offline DRMousseau

  • *
  • Posts: 416
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1987
  • Make: 34' Georgie Boy
  • Model: Cruise Air II
  • Chassis: John Deere
  • Engine: Ford 460
WOW!!! Trojan has an EXCELLENT site with a LOT of info!! AND full specs for most all their products too!!! Proud folks!!!!

Rick (and others), will note that the first two 12Vs he listed, will make a great 2-battery bank quite comparable to a pair of T-105s. The last battery, a gel, jus doesn't compare even close. Some prefer and insist on 12V, and I would certainly direct them to these.

The most common premature battery failures, are due to a lost cell,... typically a shorted cell. This is the result of plates warping and/or broken separators. Sometimes excessive buildup on the upper portions of the plates from low electrolytic levels will contribute to this. And shorting across the bottoms from shedding sediments that accumulate in the bottom of batteries. Deep cycle batteries have an extra large, empty bottom space for this.

Because 12V cells will have thinner and lighter plates and separators in a like size comparable to 6V, they will not be as durable or as resistant as 6Vs to warping plates and broken separators. RV/Marine deep-cycles WILL have better plates and of a different alloy than automotive 12V, which by design, are built for specific high-amp applications. You can "deep-cycle" an automotive battery,... but it won't last long and won't have the capacity we need.

6V batteries are the "work-horse" of deep cycle batteries. They take A LOT more abuse. The heavy plates and separators are stronger and more substantial for use where ruggedness is important,... such as electric golf cars, off-road and equipment that may be subject to greater shock, vibration and movement. Deep-cycle AGM have seen many improvement and growing use in these applications, but are still somewhat more subject to damage from temp extremes, over-charging and deep discharges. AGM and Gels were generally designed for "today's generation", who tend to overlook safety and attention. And they are very good for that purpose.

I've seen the inside of many batteries of various types, makes and condition. While I don't do much off-road scrambling with my RV,... I still prefer a rugged 6V T-105 battery bank. Mostly for it's greater ability to resist the rigors of extreme temperatures, and my occasional neglect and abuse, and also for their capacity and their longer life under the best conditions I can maintain for them. I might occasionally drain them further than I should,... and it's nice having a good bank I can count on, to get me thru when needed.

Three year old batteries in an RV,... SHOULD, be in their prime, with maximum rated capacity. As new plates "roughen" with use, more surface area is exposed for greater capacity. This occurs after a year or so of typical use. That capacity levels off for a bit and slowly begins decreasing over the long run. A good set, well cared for with a good charge management and physical maintenance program,... should last SEVERAL years to satisfaction. Keep 'em full, reasonably well charged, and comfortable (hot and cold wise), and well ventilated... don't drain 'em heavily, or charge 'em excessively. Both will generate unwelcome heat. I HATE havin' my good batteries in the forward engine compartment of the Cruise Air II,.... jus a bad place for batteries, IMO. Since I have SO much "space" available, I'm gonna convert a lower compartment for such special use. And there's much to consider.

Good tip,.... WATCH how you replace battery caps!!! Especially the individual cell cap types. Banked caps have specially located vent holes,... no matter how you replace the cap, the vent will always be AWAY from a terminal. But many of the individual caps have only ONE vent,... and it should always face away from the terminal. If it doesn't, rotate 180 and replace. This is number one cause of VIOLENTLY EXPLODED batteries!!! Number two,... and less violent, is freezing.

I wouldn't claim one brand better than another, but I know what will last longer under conditions of identical stress, abuse and circumstance. And believe me,.... the electric golf car industry is pretty abusive!!! LoL!!!
Welcome,..
To The Crazy Old Crow Medicine Show
DR Mousseau - Proprietor
Elixirs and Mixers, Potions and Lotions, Herbs, Roots, and Oils
"If I don't have it,... you don't need it!"

Offline Mr Ray

  • *
  • Posts: 15
  • I own: a Motor Home
  • Year: 1983
  • Make: Winnebago
  • Model: Minnie Winnie
  • Chassis: Chevy G30
  • Engine: 454
Very very THANKS for all the GREAT info!!!

 

FULL Membership!

Want to start enjoyingall the benefitsFull Membership has to offer?

Become a Full

Want to enjoy your

Full Membership

without ever having

to renew?

Become a:

* Salvage Yards

Find
RV Salvage Yards



By STATE

Campround Map


Instantly get info on thousands of campgrounds all
across the U.S., Canada and Mexico!